January 2019 Reads

January 2019 Reads

Not only do I love to read, but I believe books are meant to be shared.

I always seem to be reading multiple books at once, and my stack of reads on my nightstand never seems to go down because once I finish one book I add another one to the queue. If you’re curious, here are my January 2019 reads:

  • Theres No Such Thing As Bad Weather: As a new mother, I need all the reminders/parenting advice I can get. Even though we don’t really have bad winters here in sunny Southern California, I was attracted to this book based on the premise that bad weather shouldn’t stop us from taking our children outside. The title of the book, along with the addition of “there’s only bad clothes,” just about sums up the entire message of this book. However, I also loved learning more about Scandanavian culture, including  fika (making time for friends and family to share a cup of coffee (or tea) and a little something to eat) and friluftsliv (open air life). Makes me want to visit Sweden!
  • A Place For Us: Ever since high school I have been a fan of Jhumpa Lahiri, so I was excited to learn about the author of this book, Fatima Farheen Mirza. Like Lahiri, Mirza writes about the Indian immigrant experience in America – which I always find fascinating. This book jumps back and forth between time periods and different family members’s points of views, adding a new layer to the family’s saga with each perspective. I found the book a little slow with no clear direction. I was about to give up on it but the concluding chapter, which finally adds the father’s heart wrenching narrative ties the preceding chapters together…and tugs at your heart.

Recent Reads

Recent Reads

Not only do I love to read, but I believe books are meant to be shared.

I always seem to be reading multiple books at once, and my stack of reads on my nightstand never seems to go down because once I finish one book I add another one to the queue. If you’re curious, here are some of my recent reads:

  • Like a MotherA refreshing look at pregnancy, Like a Mother unpacks not only the science behind pregnancy (The placenta is AMAZING! How your body produces breast milk to provide exactly what your baby needs is fascinating!) but also leaves the reader with the author’s honest perspective on the challenges, realities and intricacies of pregnancy and motherhood.
  • Great with Child: This book was recommended to me by a sweet friend, who is also a mama-to-be (and mama to a sweet toddler boy). This book connects with mamas and mamas-to-be by poetically penning common hopes, fears, wants and wishes. It’s a beautiful meditation on motherhood, and in my experience, best enjoyed slowly with a cup of coffee or tea.
  • Gift from the SeaI found this book on my bookshelf and wondered how long it had been sitting there unread and who gave it to me.  And after reading it, I wondered why I had never picked it up before. This small book is a quick read that offers reflections on love, solitude, marriage and contentment – common themes that are just as relevant today as they were were in 1955 when this sweet read was originally published.
  • Work Rules: This book was dense, and took me a while to read. In between some of the more instructional chapters on how to lead an effective organization, I took away some great nuggets that inspired me to be a better leader, manager and employee. Something that resonated with me the most? The reminder to always be a founder, no matter your role. “One of my hopes in writing this book is that anyone reading it starts thinking of themselves as a founder. Maybe not of an entire company, but the founder of a team, a family, a culture. The fundamental lesson from Google’s experience is that you must first choose whether you are a founder or an employee. It’s not a question of literal ownership. It’s a question of attitude.” BOOM.
  • The PearlRecently reread this Steinbeck classic, complete with the rips and tears and folds from first reading it during my junior year of high school. I remember writing an essay then about the female power in the book and how Kino’s wife knew all along what evil the pearl held. I have reread it a few different times over the years and I think more than anything I like Steinbeck’s storytelling and how the story serves as a good reminder of what is important in life.
  • Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine: I’ve been jonesing for a good new fiction read lately this one and this one definitely met my literary needs. It’s a story of a quirky young lady, Eleanor, and despite her social awkwardness and her often inept ability to have an adult conversation,  she becomes very likable to the reader (and hilarious without meaning to be). Her sad and heartbreaking past and lonely life will leave you examining how you can better help someone in your life who may be lonely or need or someone who cares.

See past monthly reading lists:

Challenge Accepted

challenge accepted

I read about two books a month. And I’m happy with that number, but I recently read this article that concludes we have the capacity to read over 200 books a year. 200 books a year. That sounds like A LOT, especially since I work a full-time job and spend almost an hour commuting each day (in a non-driverless car). So where does all this time to read more (a lot more) books come from?

Maybe I should put down my phone more and find out. #ChallengeAccepted

 

January Reading List

january reading list

Not only do I love to read, but I believe books are meant to be shared.

I always seem to be reading multiple books at once, and my stack of reads on my nightstand never seems to go down because once I finish one book I add another one to the queue. If you’re curious, here’s what I read in January:

  • The Soul of Money:  This is not your typical finance book. Instead, it reminds us of the power that money holds over us and the self-talk it creates in terms of sufficiency. While I didn’t love the storytelling part of this book, I came away with a huge mindset shift on how to think about money. I am learning to be much more intentional about the way I use money – from what companies I spend it on, what organizations I donate it to, what I am saving it for, what hobbies I spend my expendable money on, and how I look at the job that I make money at – because my relationship with money and where it is going is a direct reflection of my values.
  • Finding God in the Waves January was a month filled with celebration, love and deep loss. It was the type of month that led me to turn to the spirit world and really question the meaning of life. And for me, when I get introspective on life, God always pokes his head in and wants to be part of the conversation. And finally, FINALLY, a book helped me define who and what this God guy really is. This book articulated a belief system that I feel deeply but have not been able to put into words, and I recommend it to anyone who has ever felt the pull of faith without ever being able to understand it or always believe it.

See past monthly reading lists:

September Reading List

September Reading List

Not only do I love to read, but I believe books are meant to be shared.

I always seem to be reading multiple books at once, and my stack of reads on my nightstand never seems to go down because once I finish one book I add another one to the queue. If you’re curious, here’s what I read in September:

  • Braving The WildnernessStrong back. Soft front. Wild heart. Oh man this book. It was so good that I finished it in one sitting and then promptly felt compelled to give it away to a sweet friend because this message of how we are all inextricably connected is a message that is severely needed in this wild world right now. I have tickets to see Brene Brown speak during her book tour in November and to say I am excited is an understatement.
  • What Maddy Maddy Run: This book was hard to read, but it’s an important read. It tells the story of a beautiful young athlete who’s  biggest competition ends up being her online persona. It’s a sad story of a young life taken too soon, and I think women of all ages will be able to relate on some level to the pressures that our digital society put on Maddy.

See past monthly reading lists:

August Reading List

August Reading List

Not only do I love to read, but I believe books are meant to be shared.

I always seem to be reading multiple books at once, and my stack of reads on my nightstand never seems to go down because once I finish one book I add another one to the queue. If you’re curious, here’s what I read in August:

  • Wonder: I saw a preview for this movie, and wanted to be sure I finished the book first. It’s a quick, touching, read about about a young boy that will warm your heart.
  • Wellth: I was introduced to Jacob Wachob through the MindBodyGreen Podcast which led me to be interested in this book. While this read doesn’t reveal anything completely brand new, it is a great reminder on how to live a balanced and healthy life. What I most appreciate about this book is Wachob’s realistic approach to wellness and holistic medicine.