Challenge Accepted

challenge accepted

I read about two books a month. And I’m happy with that number, but I recently read this article that concludes we have the capacity to read over 200 books a year. 200 books a year. That sounds like A LOT, especially since I work a full-time job and spend almost an hour commuting each day (in a non-driverless car). So where does all this time to read more (a lot more) books come from?

Maybe I should put down my phone more and find out. #ChallengeAccepted

 

January Reading List

january reading list

Not only do I love to read, but I believe books are meant to be shared.

I always seem to be reading multiple books at once, and my stack of reads on my nightstand never seems to go down because once I finish one book I add another one to the queue. If you’re curious, here’s what I read in January:

  • The Soul of Money:  This is not your typical finance book. Instead, it reminds us of the power that money holds over us and the self-talk it creates in terms of sufficiency. While I didn’t love the storytelling part of this book, I came away with a huge mindset shift on how to think about money. I am learning to be much more intentional about the way I use money – from what companies I spend it on, what organizations I donate it to, what I am saving it for, what hobbies I spend my expendable money on, and how I look at the job that I make money at – because my relationship with money and where it is going is a direct reflection of my values.
  • Finding God in the Waves January was a month filled with celebration, love and deep loss. It was the type of month that led me to turn to the spirit world and really question the meaning of life. And for me, when I get introspective on life, God always pokes his head in and wants to be part of the conversation. And finally, FINALLY, a book helped me define who and what this God guy really is. This book articulated a belief system that I feel deeply but have not been able to put into words, and I recommend it to anyone who has ever felt the pull of faith without ever being able to understand it or always believe it.

See past monthly reading lists:

September Reading List

September Reading List

Not only do I love to read, but I believe books are meant to be shared.

I always seem to be reading multiple books at once, and my stack of reads on my nightstand never seems to go down because once I finish one book I add another one to the queue. If you’re curious, here’s what I read in September:

  • Braving The WildnernessStrong back. Soft front. Wild heart. Oh man this book. It was so good that I finished it in one sitting and then promptly felt compelled to give it away to a sweet friend because this message of how we are all inextricably connected is a message that is severely needed in this wild world right now. I have tickets to see Brene Brown speak during her book tour in November and to say I am excited is an understatement.
  • What Maddy Maddy Run: This book was hard to read, but it’s an important read. It tells the story of a beautiful young athlete who’s  biggest competition ends up being her online persona. It’s a sad story of a young life taken too soon, and I think women of all ages will be able to relate on some level to the pressures that our digital society put on Maddy.

See past monthly reading lists:

August Reading List

August Reading List

Not only do I love to read, but I believe books are meant to be shared.

I always seem to be reading multiple books at once, and my stack of reads on my nightstand never seems to go down because once I finish one book I add another one to the queue. If you’re curious, here’s what I read in August:

  • Wonder: I saw a preview for this movie, and wanted to be sure I finished the book first. It’s a quick, touching, read about about a young boy that will warm your heart.
  • Wellth: I was introduced to Jacob Wachob through the MindBodyGreen Podcast which led me to be interested in this book. While this read doesn’t reveal anything completely brand new, it is a great reminder on how to live a balanced and healthy life. What I most appreciate about this book is Wachob’s realistic approach to wellness and holistic medicine.